Replacing your Secure FTP Server with Amazon Simple Storage Service

Introduction

What if I told you that you could get rid of most of your servers, however still consume the services that you rely on them for? No longer will you have to worry about ensuring the servers are up all the time, that they are regularly patched and updated. Would you be interested?

To quote Werner Vogel “No server is easier to manage than no server”.

In this blog, I will show you how you can potentially replace your secure ftp servers by using Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3). Amazon S3 provides additional benefits, for instance, lifecycle policies which can be used to automatically move older files to a cheaper storage, which could potentially save you lots of money.

Architecture

The solution is quite simple and is illustrated in the following diagram.

Replacing Secure FTP with Amazon S3 - Architecture

We will create an Amazon S3 bucket, which will be used to store files. This bucket will be private. We will then create some policies that will allow our users to access the Amazon S3 bucket, to upload/download files from it. We will be using the free version of CloudBerry Explorer for Amazon S3, to transfer the files to/from the Amazon S3 bucket. CloudBerry Explorer is an awesome tool, its interface is quite intuitive and for those that have used a gui version of a secure ftp client, it looks very similar.

With me so far? Perfect. Let the good times begin 😉

Lets first configure the AWS side of things and then we will move on to the client configuration.

AWS Configuration

In this section we will configure the AWS side of things.

  1. Login to your AWS Account
  2. Create a private Amazon S3 bucket (for the purpose of this blog, I have created an S3 bucket in the region US East (North Virginia) called secureftpfolder)
  3. Use the JSON below to create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy called secureftp-policy. This policy will allow access to the newly created S3 bucket (change the Amazon S3 bucket arn in the JSON to your own Amazon S3 bucket’s arn)
  4. {
        "Version": "2012-10-17",
        "Statement": [
            {
                "Sid": "SecureFTPPolicyBucketAccess",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": "s3:ListBucket",
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:s3:::secureftpfolder"
                ]
            },
            {
                "Sid": "SecureFTPPolicyObjectAccess",
                "Effect": "Allow",
                "Action": "s3:*",
                "Resource": [
                    "arn:aws:s3:::secureftpfolder/*"
                ]
            }
        ]
    }

    4. Create an AWS IAM group called secureftp-users and attach the policy created above (secureftp-policy) to it.

  5. Create AWS IAM Users with Programmatic access and add them to the AWS IAM group secureftp-users. Note down the access key and secret access key for the user accounts as these will have to be provided to the users.

Thats all that needs to be configured on the AWS side. Simple isn’t it? Now lets move on to the client configuration.

Client Configuration

In this section, we will configure CloudBerry Explorer on a computer, using one of the usernames created above.

  1. On your computer, download CloudBerry Explorer for Amazon S3 from https://www.cloudberrylab.com/explorer/amazon-s3.aspx. Note down the access key that is provided during the download as this will be required when you install it.
  2. Open the downloaded file to install it, and choose the free version when you are provided a choice between the free version and the trial for the pro version.
  3. After installation has completed, open CloudBerry Explorer.
  4. Click on File from the top menu and then choose New Amazon S3 Account.
  5. Provide a meaningful name for the Display Name (you can set this to the username that will be used)
  6. Enter the Access key and Secret key for the user that was created for you in AWS.
  7. Ensure Use SSL is ticked and then click on Advanced and change the Primary region to the region where you created the Amazon S3 bucket.
  8. Click OK  to close the Advanced screen and return to the previous screen.
  9. Click on Test Connection to verify that the entered settings are correct and that you can access the AWS Account using the the access key and secret access key.
  10. Once the settings have been verified, return to the main screen for CloudBerry Explorer. The main screen is divided into two panes, left and right. For our purposes, we will use the left-hand side pane to pick files in our local computer and the right-hand side pane to correspond to the Amazon S3 bucket.
  11. In the right-hand side pane, click on Source and from the drop down, select the name you gave the account that was created in step 4 above.
  12. Next, in the right-hand side pane, click on the green icon that corresponds to External bucket. In the window that comes up, for Bucket or path to folder/subfolder enter the name of the Amazon S3 bucket you had created in AWS (I had created secureftpfolder) and then click OK.
  13. You will now be returned to the main screen, and the Amazon S3 bucket will now be visible in the right-hand side pane. Double click on the Amazon S3 bucket name to open it. Viola! You have successfully created a connection to the Amazon S3 bucket.
  14. To copy files/folders from your local computer to the Amazon S3 bucket, select the file/folder in the left-hand pane and then drag and drop it to the right-hand pane.
  15. To copy files/folders from the Amazon S3 bucket to your local computer, drag and drop the files/folder from the right-hand pane to the appropriate folder in the left-hand pane.

 

So, tell me honestly, was that easy or what?

Just to ensure I have covered all bases (for now), here are few questions I would like to answer

A. Is the transfer of files between the local computer and Amazon S3 bucket secure?

Yes, it is secure. This is due to the Use SSL setting that we saw when configuring the account within CloudBerry Explorer.

B. Can I protect subfolders within the Amazon S3 bucket, so that different users have different access to the subfolders?

Yes, you can. You will have to modify the AWS IAM policy to do this.

C. Instead of a GUI client, can I access the Amazon S3 bucket via a script?

Yes, you can. You can download AWS tools to access the Amazon S3 bucket using the command line interface or PowerShell. AWS tools are available from https://aws.amazon.com/tools/

I hope the above comes in handy to anyone thinking of moving their secure ftp (or normal ftp) servers to a serverless architecture.

 

 

 

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Building a Breakfast Ordering Skill for Amazon Alexa – Part 1

Introduction

At the AWS Summit Sydney this year, Telstra decided to host a breakfast session for some of their VIP clients. This was more of a networking session, to get to know the clients much better. However, instead of having a “normal” breakfast session, we decided to take it up one level 😉

Breakfast ordering is quite “boring” if you ask me 😉 The waitress comes to the table, gives you a menu and asks what you would like to order. She then takes the order and after some time your meal is with you.

As it was AWS Summit, we decided to sprinkle a bit of technical fairy dust on the ordering process. Instead of having the waitress take the breakfast orders, we contemplated the idea of using Amazon Alexa instead 😉

I decided to give the Alexa skill development a go. However, not having any prior Alexa skill development experience, I anticipated an uphill battle, having to first learn the product and then developing for it. To my amazement, the learning curve wasn’t too steep and over a weekend, spending just 12 hours in total, I had a working proof of concept breakfast ordering skill ready!

Here is a link to the proof of concept skill https://youtu.be/Z5Prr31ya10

I then spent a week polishing the Alexa skill, giving it more “personality” and adding a more “human” experience.

All the work paid off when I got told that my Alexa skill would be used at the Telstra breakfast session! I was over the moon!

For the final product, to make things even more interesting, I created a business intelligence chart using Amazon QuickSight, showing the popularity of each of the food and drink items on the menu. The popularity was based on the orders that were being received.

BothVisualsSidebySide

Using a laptop, I displayed the chart near the Amazon Echo Dot. This was to help people choose what food or drink they wanted to order (a neat marketing trick 😉 ) . If you would like to know more about Amazon QuickSight, you can read about it at Amazon QuickSight – An elegant and easy to use business analytics tool

Just as a teaser, you can watch one of the ordering scenarios for the finished breakfast ordering skill at https://youtu.be/T5PU9Q8g8ys

In this blog, I will introduce the architecture behind Amazon Alexa and prepare you for creating an Amazon Alexa Skill. In the next blog, we will get our hands dirty with creating the breakfast ordering Alexa skill.

How does Amazon Alexa actually work?

I have heard a lot of people use the name “Alexa” interchangeably for the Amazon Echo devices. As good as it is for Amazon’s marketing team, unfortunately, I have to set the records straight. Amazon Echo are the physical devices that Amazon sells that interface to the Alexa Cloud. You can see the whole range at https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Echo-And-Alexa-Devices/b?ie=UTF8&node=9818047011. These devices don’t have any smarts in them. They sit in the background listening for the “wake” command, and then they start streaming the audio to Alexa Cloud. Alexa Cloud is where all the smarts are located. Using speech recognition, machine learning and natural language processing, Alexa Cloud converts the audio to text. Alexa Cloud identifies the skill name that the user had requested, the intent and any slot values it finds (these will be explained further in the next blog). The intent and slot values (if any) are passed to the identified skill. The skill uses the input and processes it using some form of compute (AWS Lambda in my case) and then passes the output back to Alexa Cloud. Alexa Cloud, converts the skill output to Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) and sends it to the Amazon Echo device. The device then converts the SSML to audio and plays it to the user.

Below is an overview of the process.

alexa-skills-kit-diagram._CB1519131325_

Diagram is from https://developer.amazon.com/blogs/alexa/post/1c9f0651-6f67-415d-baa2-542ebc0a84cc/build-engaging-skills-what-s-inside-the-alexa-json-request

Getting things ready

Getting an Alexa enabled device

The first thing to get is an Alexa enabled device. Amazon has released quite a few different varieties of Alexa enabled devices. You can checkout the whole family here.

If you are keen to try a side project, you can build your own Alexa device using a Raspberry Pi. A good guide can be found at https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2016/10/how-to-build-your-own-amazon-echo-with-a-raspberry-pi/

You can also try out EchoSim (Amazon Echo Simulator). This is a browser-based interface to Amazon Alexa. Please ensure you read the limits of EchoSim on their website. For instance, it cannot stream music

For developing the breakfast ordering skill, I decided to purchase an Amazon Echo Dot. It’s a nice compact device, which doesn’t cost much and can run off any usb power source. For the Telstra Breakfast session, I actually ran it off my portable battery pack 😉

Create an Amazon Account

Now that you have got yourself an Alexa enabled device, you will need an Amazon account to register it with. You can use one that you already have or create a new one. If you don’t have an Amazon account, you can either create one beforehand by going to https://www.amazon.com or you can create it straight from the Alexa app (the Alexa app is used to register the Amazon Echo device).

Setup your Amazon Echo Device

Use the Alexa app to setup your Amazon Echo device. When you login to the app, you will be asked for the Amazon Account credentials. As stated above, if you don’t have an Amazon account, you can create it from within the app.

Create an Alexa Developer Account

To create skills for Alexa, you need a developer account. If you don’t have one already, you can create one by going to https://developer.amazon.com/alexa. There are no costs associated with creating an Alexa developer account.

Just make sure that the username you choose for your Alexa developer account matches the username of the Amazon account to which your Amazon Echo is registered to. This will enable you to test your Alexa skills on your Amazon Echo device without having to publish it on the Alexa Skills Store (the skills will show under Your Skills in the Alexa App)

Create an AWS Free Tier Account

In order to process any of the requests sent to the breakfast ordering Alexa skill, we will make use of AWS Lambda. AWS Lambda provides a cheap and cost-effective way to run code due to the fact that you are only charged for the time that the code is run. There are no costs for any idle time.

If you already have an AWS account, you can use that otherwise, you can sign up for an AWS Free tier account by going to https://aws.amazon.com . AWS provides a lot of services for free for the first 12 months under the Free Tier, with some services continuing the free tier allowance even beyond the 12 months (AWS Lambda is one such). For a full list of Free Tier services, visit https://aws.amazon.com/free/

High Level Architecture for the Breakfast Ordering Skill

Below is the architectural overview for the Breakfast Ordering Skill that I built. I will introduce you to the various components over the next few blogs.Breakfast Ordering System_HighLevelArchitecture

In the next blog, I will take you through the Alexa Developer console, where we will use the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) to start creating our breakfast ordering skill. We will define the invocation name, intents, slot names for our Alexa Skill. Not familiar with these terms? Don’t worry,  I will explain them in the next blog.  I hope to see you there.

See you soon.

 

Deploying an Active Directory Forest using AWS CloudFormation

Introduction

Wow, it is amazing how time flies. Almost two years ago, I wrote a set of blogs that showed how one can use Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates and Desired State Configuration (DSC) scripts to deploy an Active Directory Forest automatically.

For those that would like to take a trip down memory lane, here is the link to the blog.

Recently, I have been playing with AWS CloudFormation and I am simply in awe by its power. For those that are not familiar with AWS CloudFormation, it is a tool, similar to Azure Resource Manager, that allows you to “code” your computing infrastructure in Amazon Web Services. Long gone are the days when you would have to sit down, pressing each button and choosing each option to deploy your environment. Cloud computing provides you with a way to interface with the fabric, so that you can script the build of your environment. The benefits of this are enormous. Firstly, it allows you to standardise all your builds. Secondly, it allows you to have a live as-built document (the code is the as-built document). Thirdly, the code is re-useable. Most important of all, since the deployment is now scripted, you can automate it.

In this blog I will show you how to create an AWS CloudFormation template to deploy an AWS Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) Windows Server instance. The template will also include steps to promote the EC2 instance to a Domain Controller in a new Active Directory Forest.

Guess what the best part is? Once the template has been created, all you will have to do is to load it into AWS CloudFormation, provide a few values and sit back and relax. AWS CloudFormation will do everything for you from there on!

Sounds interesting? Lets begin.

Creating the CloudFormation Template

A CloudFormation template starts with a definition of the parameters that will be used. The person running the template (lets refer to them as an operator) will be asked to provide the values for these parameters.

When defining a parameter, you will provide the following

  • a name for the parameter
  • its type
  • a brief description for the parameter so that the operator knows what it will be used for
  • any constraints you want to put on the parameter, for instance
    • a maximum length (for strings)
    • a list of allowed values (in this case a drop down list is presented to the operator, to choose from)
  • a default value for the parameter

For our template, we will use the following parameters.

Next, we will define some mappings. Mappings allow us to define the values for variables, based on what value was provided for a parameter.

When creating EC2 instances, we need to provide a value for the Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to be used. In our case, we will use the OS version to decide which AMI to use.

To find the subnet into which the EC2 instance will be deployed in, we will use the Environment and AvailabilityZone parameters to find it.

The code below defines the mappings we will use

The next section in the CloudFormation template is Resources. This defines all resources that will be created.

If you have any experience deploying Active Directory Forests, you will know that it is extremely simple to do it using PowerShell scripts. Guess what, we will be using PowerShell scripts as well 😉 Now, after the EC2 instance has been created, we need to provide the PowerShell scripts to it, so that it can run them. We will use AWS Simple Storage Service (S3) buckets to store our PowerShell scripts.

To ensure our PowerShell scripts are stored securely, we will allow access to it only via a certain role and policy.

The code below will create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role and policy to access the S3 Bucket where the PowerShell scripts are stored.

We will use cf-init to do all the heavy lifting for us, once the EC2 instance has been created. cf-init is a utility that is present by default in EC2 instances and we can ask it to perform tasks for us.

To trigger cf-init, we will use the Userdata feature of EC2 instance provisioning. cf-init, when started, will check the EC2 Metadata for the credentials it will use, and it will also check it for all the tasks it needs to perform.

Below is the metadata that will be used. For simplicity, I have hardcoded the URL to the files in the S3 bucket.

As you can see, I have first defined the role that cf-init will use to access the S3 bucket. Next, the following tasks will be carried out, in the order defined in the configuration set

  • get-files
    • it will download the files from S3 and place them in the local directory c:\s3-downloads\scripts.
  • configure-instance (the commands in this section are run in alphabetical order, that is why I have prefixed them with a number, to ensure it follows the order I want)
    • It will change the execution policy for PowerShell to unrestricted (please note that this is just for demonstration purposes and the execution policy should not be made this relaxed).
    • next, the name of the server will be changed to what was provided in the Parameters section
    • the following Windows Components will be installed (as defined in the Add-WindowsComponents.ps1 script file)
      • RSAT-AD-PowerShell
      • AD-Domain-Services
      • DNS
      • GPMC
    • the Active Directory Forest will be created, using the Configure-ADForest.ps1 script and the values provided in the Parameters section

In the last part of the CloudFormation template, we will provide the UserData information that will trigger cfn-init to run and do all the configuration. We will also tag the the EC2 instance, based on values from the Parameters section.

For simplicity, I have hardcoded the security group that will be attached to the EC2 instance (this is defined as GroupSet under NetworkInterfaces). You can easily create an additional parameter for this, if you want.

Finally, our template will output the instance’s hostname, environment it has been created in and its privateip. This provides an easy way to identify the EC2 instance once it has been created.

Below is the last part of the template

Now all you have to do is login to AWS CloudFormation, load the template we have created, provide the parameter values and sit back and relax.

AWS CloudFormation will take it from here and do everything for you 😉

How easy was that? Magic 🙂

The complete CloudFormation template is available at https://gist.github.com/nivleshc/867b1a2ca119c7d22cf215b5a9a5de02

The two PowerShell Scripts that are used in the CloudFormation template can be downloaded using the links below

Add-WindowsComponents.ps1

Configure-ADForest.ps1

For anyone deploying an Active Directory Forest in AWS, I hope the above comes in handy.

Enjoy 😉

Amazon QuickSight – An elegant and easy to use business analytics tool

Introduction

Recently, I had a requirement for a tool to visualise some data I had collected. My requirements were very simple. I didn’t want something that would cost me a lot, and at the same time I wanted the reports to be elegant and informative. Most of all, I didn’t want to have to go through pages and pages of documentation to learn how to use it.

As my data was within Amazon Web Services (AWS), I thought to check if AWS had any such offerings. Guess what, there was indeed a tool just for what I wanted, and after using it, I was amazed at how simple and elegant it is.

In this blog, I will show how you can easily get started with Amazon QuickSight. I will take you through the steps to import your data into Amazon QuickSight and then create some informative visualisations.

Some background on Amazon QuickSight

Pricing

Amazon QuickSight is very inexpensive, infact, if your data is not too much, you won’t have to pay anything!

For standard edition use, Amazon QuickSight provides 1GB of SPICE for the first user free per month. SPICE is an acronym for Super-fast, Parallel, In-memory, Calculation Engine and it uses a combination of columnar storage, in-memory technologies enabled through the latest hardware innovations, machine code generation, and data compression to allow users to run interactive queries on large datasets and get rapid responses.  SPICE is the calculation engine that Amazon QuickSight uses.

Any additional SPICE is priced at $USD0.25 per GB/month. For the latest pricing, please refer to https://aws.amazon.com/quicksight/#Pricing

Data Sources

Currently Amazon QuickSight supports the following data sources

  • Relational Data Sources
    • Amazon Athena
    • Amazon Aurora
    • Amazon Redshift
    • Amazon Redshift Spectrum
    • Amazon S3
    • Amazon S3 Analytics
    • Apache Spark 2.0 or later
    • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 or later
    • MySQL 5.1 or later
    • PostgreSQL 9.3.1 or later
    • Presto 0.167 or later
    • Snowflake
    • Teradata 14.0 or later
  • File Data Sources
    • CSV/TSV – (comma separated, tab separated value text files)
    • ELF/CLF – Extended and common log format files
    • JSON – Flat or semi-structured data files
    • XLSX – Microsoft Excel files

Unfortunately, currently Amazon DynamoDB is not supported as a native data source. Since my data is in Amazon DynamoDB, I had to write some custom lambda functions to export it to a csv file, so that it could be imported into Amazon QuickSight.

Ok, time for that walk-through I promised earlier.  For this blog, I will be using an S3 bucket as my data source. It will contain the CSV files that I will use for analysis in Amazon QuickSight.

Step 1 – Create S3 buckets

If you haven’t already done so, create an S3 bucket that will contain the csv files. The S3 bucket does not have to be publicly accessible. Once created, upload the csv files into the S3 bucket.

In my case, the csv file is called orders.csv and its location is https://s3.amazonaws.com/sample/orders.csv (to get the URL to your S3 file, login to the S3 console and navigate to the S3 bucket that contains the file. Click the S3 bucket to open it, then click the file name to open its properties. Under Overview you will see Link. This is the URL to the file)

Step 2 – Create an Amazon QuickSight Account

Before you start using Amazon QuickSight, you must create an account. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a way for creating an Amazon QuickSight account without creating an Amazon AWS account. If you don’t have an existing Amazon AWS account, you can create an AWS Free Tier account. Once you have got an AWS account, go ahead and create an Amazon QuickSight account at https://aws.amazon.com/quicksight/.

While creating your Amazon QuickSight account, you will be asked if you would like Amazon QuickSight to auto-discover your Amazon S3 buckets. Enable this and then click to Choose S3 buckets. Choose the S3 bucket that you created in Step 1 above. This will give Amazon QuickSight read-only access to the S3 bucket, so that it can read the data for analysis.

Step 3 – Create a manifest file

A manifest file is a JSON file that provides the location and format of the data files to Amazon QuickSight. This is required when creating a data set for S3 data sources. Please refer to https://docs.aws.amazon.com/quicksight/latest/user/supported-manifest-file-format.html if you would like more information about manifest files.

Below is my manifest file, which I have affectionately named ordersmanifest.json.

{
   "fileLocations": [
      {
         "URIs": [
            "https://s3.amazonaws.com/sample/orders.csv"
         ]
      },
   ],
   "globalUploadSettings": {
      "format": "CSV",
      "delimiter": ",",
      "textqualifier": "'",
      "containsHeader": "true"
   }
}

Once created, upload the manifest file into the same S3 bucket as to where the csv file is stored.

Step 4 – Create a data set

  • Login to your Amazon QuickSight account. From the top right, click on Manage data
  • In the next screen, click on New data set
  • In the next screen, for Create a Data Set FROM NEW DATA SOURCES, click on S3
  • In the next screen
    • provide a name for the data source
    • for Upload a manifest file ensure URL is clicked and enter the URL to the manifest file (you can get the url by logging into the S3 console, and then clicking on the manifest file to reveal its properties. Under the Overview tab, you will see Link. This is the URL to the manifest file).NewS3DataSource
    • Click Connect
    • Amazon QuickSight will now read the manifest file and then import the csv file to SPICE. You will see the following screenFinishDataSetCreation
    • Click on Edit/Preview data.
    • In the next screen, you will see the contents of the data file that was imported, along with the Fields name on the left. If you want to exclude any columns from the analysis, simply untick them (I unticked orderTime (S) since I didn’t need it) EditPreviewDataSet
    • By default, the data is called Group 1. To customise the name, replace Group 1 with a text of your choice (I have renamed my data to Orders Data)RenameGroup1Label
    • Click Save & visualize from the top menu

Step 5 – Create Visualisations

Now that you have imported the data into SPICE, you can start analysing it and creating visualisations.

After step 4, you should be in the Analysis section.

  • Depending on which visualisation you want, you can select the respective type under Visual types from the bottom left hand side of the screen. For my visualisations, I chose Pie Chart (side note – you will notice that orderTime (S)  isn’t listed under Fields list. This is because we had unticked it in the previous screen)OrdersDataAnalysis-01
  • I want to create two Pie Charts, one to show me analysis about what is the most popular foodName and another to find out what is the most popular drinkName. For the first Pie Chart, drag foodName (S) from the Fields list to the Value – Add a measure here box  in the top of the screen. Then drag foodName (S) from the Fields list to the Group/Color – Add a dimension here box in the top of the screen. You will see the followingOrdersDataAnalysis-02
  • You can customise the visualisation title Count of Foodname (S) by Foodname (S) by clicking it and then changing the text (I have changed the title to Popularity of Food Types)FoodNamePopularity
  • If you look closely, the legend on the right hand side doesn’t serve much purpose since the pie slices are already labelled quite well. You can also get rid of the legend and get more space for your visual. To do this, click on the down arrow above FoodName (S) on the right and then select Hide legend FoodNameHideLengend
  • Next, lets create a Pie Chart visualisation for drinkName. From the top menu, click on Add and then Add visual drinkNameAddVisual
  • You will now have another Canvas at the bottom of the first Pie Chart. Click this new canvas area to select it (a blue border will appear to show that it is selected). From Visual types at the bottom left hand side, click on the Pie Chart visual. Then from the top, click on Field wells to expose the Value and Group/Color boxes for the second canvas drinkNameCanvas
  • From the Field list on the left, drag drinkName (S) to the Value – Add a measure here box  in the top of the screen. Then drag drinkName (S) from the Fields list to the Group/Color – Add a dimension here box in the top of the screen. You will now see the following foodanddrinkvisual
  • We are almost done. I actually want the two Pie Charts to sit side by side, instead of one ontop ofthe other. To do this, I will show you a neat trick. In each of the visuals, at the bottom right border, you will see two diagonal lines. If you move your mouse pointer over them, they change to a resizing cursor. Use this to resize the visual’s canvas area. Also, in the middle of the top border of the visual, you will see two rows of gray dots. Click your mouse pointer on this and drag to the location you want to move the visual to.VisualResizeandMove
  • I have hidden the legend for the second visual, customised the title and resized both the visuals and moved them side by side. Viola! Below is what I get. Not bad aye!BothVisualsSidebySide

Step 6 – Create a dashboard

Now that the visuals have been created, they can be shared it with others. This can be done by creating a dashboard. A dashboard is a read-only snapshot of the analysis. When you share the dashboard with others, they can view and filter the dashboard data, however any filters applied to the dashboard visual exist only when the user is viewing the dashboard, and aren’t saved once it is closed.

One thing to note about sharing dashboards – you can only share dashboards with users who have an Amazon QuickSight account.

Creating a dashboard is very easy.

  • In the Analysis screen, on the top right corner, click on Share and then select Create dashboardCreateDashboard
  • You can either replace an existing dashboard or create a new one. In our case, since we are creating a new dashboard, select Create a new dashboard as and enter a name for the dashboard. Once finished, click Create dashboardCreateDashboard-Name
  • You will then be asked to enter the username or email address of those you want to share the dashboard with. Enter this and click on Share ShareDashboard
  • That’s it, your dashboard is now created. To access it, go to the Amazon QuickSight home screen (click on the Amazon QuickSight icon on the top left hand side of the screen) and then click on All dashboards. Those that you have shared the dashboard with will also be able to see it once they login to their Amazon QuickSight account.AllDashboards

Step 6 – Refreshing the Data Set

If your data set continually changes, your visualisations/dashboards will not show the updated information. This can be done by refreshing the data set. Doing this will import the new data into SPICE, which will then automatically update the analysis/visualisations and dashboards

Note: you will have to manually reload the webpage to see the updated visualisations and dashboard

There are two ways of refreshing data sets. One is to do it manually while the other is to use a schedule. The scheduled data refresh allows for the data to be automatically refreshed at a certain time daily, weekly or monthly. A maximum of five scheduled refreshes can be configured.

The steps below show how you can manually refresh the data or create schedules to refresh the data

  • From the Amazon QuickSight main screen, click on Manage data from the top left of the screen ManageData
  • In the next screen, you will see all your currently configured data sets. Click the Orders Data dataset (this is the one we had created previously).
  • In the next screen, you will see Refresh Now and Schedule refreshManualScheduleDataRefresh
  • Clicking on Refresh Now will manually refresh the data. Clicking on Schedule refresh will bring up the screen where you can configure a schedule for refreshing the data automatically.

 

That’s it folks! Wasn’t that simple? If you already have an Amazon AWS account, I would strongly recommend giving Amazon QuickSight a try for all your analytics needs. Even if you don’t have an Amazon AWS account, I would still suggest getting an AWS free tier account to try it out.

Enjoy 😉

 

My path to AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate

Almost a week and a half ago, I sat for and passed my AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate  (AWS CSAA) exam. To be quite honest, I felt the biggest sense of relief, after walking out of the exam centre, not because I had passed, but because I had finally forced myself to sit this exam.

Since posting on LinkedIn about passing my AWS CSAA exam, I have received a lot of requests from people, asking for tips on how to prepare for this exam. In addition to replying to them, I thought best to also put up a blog post, to help others that might be preparing to sit for the same exam.

I have been a Microsoft person for years, so it was quite natural for me to transition to Microsoft Azure a few years back. Microsoft Azure, to put it simply, is awesome. It empowers its users to grow their IT much faster and beyond what their local datacenter’s can accomodate, with a simple, pay-as-you-use model. This model has helped so many businesses become successful, in such a short amount of time.

I start my New Year, each year, with a list of technologies that I had been introduced to, in the year that had just finished, but did not get a chance to properly get acquainted with. This list, then condenses into my list of todos for that year. Last year, AWS made it into my list and since then I have been spending time, finding out all about it.

Exams to me are not just a certification, but a chance to find more about a technology and to re-confirm my understanding of it. That is why I try my best to learn as much as possible about the technologies being tested in an exam. What better way to learn more about AWS then to do the AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate exam 😉

I got my training material from https://acloud.guru Ryan Kroonenburg teaches an awesome course to get one prepared to sit for the exam. The course is not too expensive either, well within the budget of anyone.

However, a note of caution. If you are very new to AWS and think that just doing the course will be enough to pass the exam, then there is some news for you. The whole basis for the AWS exams is to test you on your hands on experience and just cramming the information and proceeding to sit for the exam will be preparing yourself for a fail. I would highly recommend doing the labs that Ryan takes you through in the course. AWS provides a free tier, which covers almost all that you will need to train for the AWS CSAA exam. You can make use of this to get lots of hands on training. Also, read the whitepapers and faqs. These provide detailed information about the AWS services. ACloud.guru also has forums where you can ask questions and also answer questions others have posted.

To recap, my tips for passing the AWS CSAA exam

  • purchase the ACloud.guru course for AWS CSAA
  • go through the videos in the ACloud.guru course at least twice and do all the labs
  • answer all the section quizzes, the Mega Quizzes and Final exam questions and do them till you get at least 90% correct
  • read the AWS whitepapers and FAQs
  • participate in the ACloud.guru forums

You will soon realise that you are confident enough to sit the exam and that is when you book it and go sit for it.

I would highly recommend not waiting too long to sit for your exam (I have learnt from my mistake). I find that if I wait for more than a month to book my exam, I normally start forgetting all that I have learnt, and have to go over the material all over again. Everyone is different, so this might not be true for you. I would suggest aiming for 1 month of training, however in the 2nd week, book your exam for a date 2 weeks away. Doing this will firstly put you in panic mode, but then you will soon realise that you don’t have much time to study, and will start studying more intensely. By the last week, if you still think you are not fully prepared, you have 72 hours to reschedule the exam. If you are going to reschedule, then don’t reschedule to a date too far in the future.

I wish you all the best for the exam.

Re-execute the UserData script in an AWS Windows Instance

Bootstrapping is an awesome way of customising your instances in AWS (similar capability exists in Azure).

To enable bootstrapping, while configuring the launch instance, in Step 3: Configure Instance Details scroll down to the bottom and then expand Advanced Details.

You will notice a User data text box. This is where you can provide your bootstrap script. The script will be run when your instance is first launched.

AWS_BootstrapScript

I went ahead and entered my script in the text box and proceeded to complete my instance configuration. Once my instance was running, I initiated a Remote Desktop connection to it, to confirm that my script had run. Unfortunately, I couldn’t see any customisations (which meant my script didn’t run)

Thinking that the instance had not been able to access the user data, I opened up Internet Explorer and then browsed to the following url (this is an internal url that can be used to access the user-data)

http://169.254.169.254/latest/user-data/

I was able to successfully access the user-data, which meant that there were no issues with that.  However when checking the content, I noticed a typo! Aha, that was the reason why my customisations didn’t happen.

Unfortunately, according to AWS, user-data is only executed during launch (for those that would like to read, here is the official AWS documentation). To get the fixed bootstrap script to run, I would have to terminate my instance and launch a new one with the corrected script (I tried re-booting my windows instance after correcting my typo, however it didn’t run).

I wasn’t very happy on terminating my current instance and then launching a new one, since for those that might not be aware, AWS EC2 compute charges are rounded up to the next hour. Which means that if I terminated my current instance and launched a new one, I would be charged for 2 x 1hour sessions instead of just 1 x 1 hour!

So I set about trying to find another solution. And guess what, I did find it 🙂

Reading through the volumes of documentation on AWS, I found that when Windows Instances are provisioned, the service that does the customisations using user-data is called EC2Config. This service runs the initial startup tasks when the instance is first started and then disables them. HOWEVER, there is a way to re-enable the startup tasks later on 🙂 Here is the document that gives more information on EC2Config.

The Amazon Windows AMIs include a utility called EC2ConfigService Settings. This allows you to configure EC2Config to execute the user-data on next service startup. The utility can be found under All Programs (or you can search for it).

AWS_EC2ConfigSettings_AllApps

AWS_EC2ConfigSettings_Search

Once Open, under General you will see the following option

Enable UserData execution for next service start (automatically enabled at Sysprep) eg. or <powershell></powershell>

AWS_EC2ConfigSettings

Tick this option and then press OK. Then restart your Windows Instance.

After your Windows Instance restarts, EC2Config will execute the userData (bootstrap script) and then it will automatically remove the tick from the above option so that the userData is not executed on subsequent restarts (or service starts)

There you go. A simple way to re-run your bootstrap scripts on an AWS Windows Instance without having to terminate the current instance and launching a new one.

There are other options available in the EC2ConfigService Settings that you can explore as well 🙂

 

Usable IP Addresses in an Azure {and AWS} Subnet

Over the last week I got asked an interesting question.

“Why is it that you always give x.x.x.4 ip address to you first Azure virtual machine? Why don’t you start with x.x.x.1 ?”

This is a very interesting question, and needs to be kept in mind whenever transitioning from On-Premise to Azure. In Azure, there are a few IP addresses that are reserved for system use and cannot be allocated to virtual machines.

The first and last IP addresses of a subnet have always been unavailable for machine addressing because the first IP address is the network address and the last is the broadcast address for the subnet.

In addition to the above, the next 3 IP addresses from the beginning are used by Azure for internal use.

Always keep the above in mind when allocating IP addresses in Azure.

Below are some helpful links that can provide more information

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-networks-faq/

https://www.petri.com/understanding-ip-addressing-microsoft-azure

I came across a similar article for AWS. AWS also removes 5 IP addresses from the pool, for internal use. However, this article was more informative in regards to why these IP addresses are unavailable. I have a suspicion that Azure has the same reasons, however I couldn’t find any article on it.

Here is the AWS article http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonVPC/latest/UserGuide/VPC_Subnets.html

and below is the section that describes why the IP addresses are unavailable in AWS

The first four IP addresses and the last IP address in each subnet CIDR block are not available for you to use, and cannot be assigned to an instance. For example, in a subnet with CIDR block 10.0.0.0/24, the following five IP addresses are reserved:

  • 10.0.0.0: Network address.
  • 10.0.0.1: Reserved by AWS for the VPC router.
  • 10.0.0.2: Reserved by AWS for mapping to the Amazon-provided DNS. (Note that the IP address of the DNS server is the base of the VPC network range plus two. For more information, see Amazon DNS Server.)
  • 10.0.0.3: Reserved by AWS for future use.
  • 10.0.0.255: Network broadcast address. We do not support broadcast in a VPC, therefore we reserve this address.